Friday, 26 May 2017

Science Improves Understanding of How Skin Products Work




Nobody wants to use unhealthy products on their skin. If you only purchase skincare items labeled organic, natural or the like, does that mean they actually do what they claim for your complexion? As skincare – and consumers – become more sophisticated, scientists are researching how the molecular structure of different products affects skin molecules. For skincare manufacturers, this means they can develop or enhance products based on state-of-the-art scientific research. It also gives consumers access to healthier, more effective skin cleansers, moisturizers and anti-aging products.

Skin Structure

The skin’s outermost of its five layers is known as the Stratum Corneum (SC). It’s the barometer for the skin’s overall health and forms a protective barrier. The molecules in this upper layer are fluid. Solvents used in skincare and other products may change the SC’s protective barrier function. A recently published study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences notes, “Deepened understanding of molecular effects of foreign compounds in SC fluidity can therefore have strong impact on the development of skin products in pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and sanitary applications.”

Collagen Repair

There’s already plenty of skincare items on the market that researchers know can’t perform as advertised because of their molecular structure. Collagen is a good example. Collagen is the primary structure in the body. It keeps skin firm and supple. Collagen production decreases as people age, resulting in wrinkles and sagging skin. There are plenty of creams on the market advertising their collagen content – and they’re all natural, to boot. The bad news is that collagen molecules are too large to penetrate the dermal surface. None of that collagen is actually absorbed into the skin, so the products are a waste of money. There are methods of injecting collagen into the skin, but these expensive procedures are done by a doctor, not in your own bathroom.

Retinols

Skincare formulations containing retinols succeed because they work on the molecular level. Vitamin A is the base of all retinols, and on the molecular level, vitamin A can penetrate into the lowest levels of the skin. Once there, it slows collagen breakdown and helps prevent wrinkle formation. Not only are retinols scientifically proven to lessen wrinkling, but it improves skin tone and firmness. The strongest types of retinols, such as Retin-A, are available only by prescription. Over-the-counter products containing retinols are less strong, but still possess anti-aging properties.
- See more at: http://www.healthyskinportal.com/articles/science-improves-understanding-how-skin-products-work/972/#sthash.KOAaWV1H.dpuf

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